LV Zoo Mourns Loss of Baby, the Dromedary Camel

Newsroom
Lehigh Valley Zoo
June 16, 2022

(Schnecksville, PA) – Lehigh Valley Zoo is deeply saddened to announce the passing of Baby, a 23-year-old Dromedary Camel, this week. Baby had been under close monitoring and medical care for chronic osteoarthritis for many years and the decision was made to euthanize as her chronic medical issues were increasingly impacting her health and quality of life. In addition, the animal care team noticed behavioral changes following the loss of her 27-year-old mother, Leena.

Photo of Baby, the dromedary camelLV Zoo’s veterinary and animal care teams made the difficult decision to euthanize Leena earlier this month, after she was monitored closely through quality of life and welfare assessments regarding her chronic osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis is commonly seen in older animals as a degenerative change that appears as they age. Typically, camels live healthy lives into their early 20s, rarely living beyond 30. Both Leena and Baby received medications daily to help them to walk comfortably for as long as possible. In addition, a strong relationship with their keepers allowed Leena and Baby to participate in trained behaviors that helped staff monitor and treat their osteoarthritis.

“The animal care team at Lehigh Valley Zoo is dedicated to providing excellent animal welfare,” Curator Maggie Morse said. “Making these difficult decisions when we see an animal in declining health — unable to have a quality of life — is part of providing principled welfare.”

Both Leena and Baby were among some of the oldest camels recorded in the Zoological Information Management System (ZIMS), which is a testament to the care from the LV Zoo staff.

The LV Zoo staff will fondly remember Baby, who was born at LV Zoo to Leena in 1999 and spent her entire life in the Lehigh Valley. Baby was seen by millions of zoo visitors and served as a wonderful ambassador, teaching staff and visitors alike about the behavior, biology and social nature of Dromedary Camels. Baby and Leena will be greatly missed by the zoo staff and community.

As for the habitat, LV Zoo expects to add another species beneficial to the Species Survival Plan (SSP) of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) in the upcoming months.

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As a member-supported non-profit organization, Lehigh Valley Zoological Society was founded in 2004, but as a treasured community landmark, the Zoo’s history spans over a century. Founded in 1906 by General Harry C. Trexler, a local industrialist, the Lehigh Valley’s Trexler Game Preserve has educated and entertained more than five million people.

Accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), the Lehigh Valley Zoo hosts year-round, family-friendly events and activities, educational programs, and camps. With a mission to create a safe, engaging and enlightening wildlife experience for guests of all ages, the Zoo demonstrates leadership in the cultural, scientific and conservation communities. To learn more about Lehigh Valley Zoo, we invite you to visit our website, www.lvzoo.org, or follow us on Facebook @LVZOO.

LV Zoo Breaks Ground for New Exhibit, Habitat Madagascar

Newsroom
Lehigh Valley Zoo
June 9, 2022

Left to right: Gina Vary, Project Architect, Spillman Farmer Architects; Ron Jerdon, President, Jerdon Construction; Amanda Shurr, President and CEO, LV Zoo; Dean Meiser, Project Manager, Jerdon Construction; Maggie Morse, Curator, LV Zoo; Matt Goense, Secretary, LV Zoo Board of Directors (Owner, Krings Stoves and Fireplaces); Radley the Sea Turtle, Mascot, LV Zoo

(Schnecksville, Pa.) – Lehigh Valley Zoo is proud to announce the official groundbreaking for Habitat Madagascar took place on Thursday, June 9. Along with general contractor Jerdon Construction and exhibit architect Spillman Farmer Architects, the LV Zoo revealed the plans and process for this new, indoor/outdoor habitat for its Lemurs and Tortoises that will be located between the Australia and Africa areas of the Zoo. Construction is expected to be completed in the fall.

Casilio Concrete, also in attendance, is providing additional support for the building infrastructure.

Left to right: Gina Vary, Project Architect, Spillman Farmer Architects; Ron Jerdon, President, Jerdon Construction; Amanda Shurr, President and CEO, LV Zoo; Dean Meiser, Project Manager, Jerdon Construction; Maggie Morse, Curator, LV Zoo; Matt Goense, Secretary, LV Zoo Board of Directors (Owner, Krings Stoves and Fireplaces)“The Lehigh Valley Zoo is excited to be breaking ground on our first new exhibit in five years,” said Amanda Shurr, President and CEO. “We are committed to building the best new habitats, as well as updating our existing exhibits, to provide the best welfare for the animals under our care. This is the first of many projects we have planned that will directly impact both our current animal residents and future species for our Zoo. We appreciate the support of the Lehigh Valley community as we start this project and are eager for it to be completed and be enjoyed by all.”

In addition to housing the LV Zoo’s Lemurs and Tortoises, the 1,600-square-foot building will provide behind-the-scenes living space for the animals when they are off-exhibit as well as being climate controlled to ensure the optimum environment year round. The animals will be able to spend time in their almost 300-square-foot outdoor habitat during the warmer, in-season months at LV Zoo. They will also be able to be viewed by guests during the colder months of the year in the 500 square feet of indoor exhibit space.

The indoor lobby of this exhibit will include a 10-foot donor wall, which will display names of the supporters of the exhibit. The lobby will also display digital educational and conservation messaging, which will provide LV Zoo guests a wealth of information about the species living in the exhibit. Lastly, the indoor lobby will also be accessible for small gatherings or events, which will help generate revenue that will ensure the sustainability of this exhibit well into the future.

Architectural rendering of Habitat MadagascarHabitat Madagascar will immediately house LV Zoo’s male and female Mongoose Lemurs, Abby and Mico, who are a potential breeding pair. The indoor exhibit space will provide a safe breeding environment for the lemurs and features a separate “suite,” which LV Zoo hopes will be occupied by future Lemur mothers and babies.

Habitat Madagascar will also be a home for LV Zoo’s African Leopard Tortoises. These Tortoises are currently shifted between several exhibits and living spaces throughout the year depending on the weather and temperature, and LV Zoo is excited to provide them with one space to call “home.” This multiple-species environment will meet the ideals of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA); LV Zoo’s accrediting body. The goal is to develop mixed species habitats that will allow the public to see species living together similar to the way they would live in the wild.

LV Zoo plans to add additional Lemur species, as well as other small primates, in the future. Different Lemur species co-exist in the wild on Madagascar, an island in the Indian Ocean off the coast of Africa. LV Zoo is thrilled to join other AZA institutions in their efforts to successfully breed and raise different Lemur species in the same habitats.


Conservation of Endangered Species

Mongoose Lemurs are considered critically endangered according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. Human activity is negatively impacting Lemur populations and their home on the island of Madagascar is diminishing at an alarming rate. In fact, it’s estimated that about 1-2% of Madagascar’s forests are destroyed each year, and only about 10% of Madagascar’s forests remain. Slash-and-burn agriculture, clearing land for cattle and charcoal production are destroying these precious forest ecosystems. By establishing a breeding exhibit, LV Zoo will be helping to contribute to the survival of this species into the future.

In addition to habitat destruction, unfortunately both Lemurs and Tortoises are poached by people in the wild and sold, in some cases, into the illegal, exotic pet trade. If these animals continue to be taken from the wild, we will only continue to see their wild population numbers decrease. The exotic pet trade also puts both animals and humans at risk through the spread of zoonotic diseases. The goal of LV Zoo is to provide education within this new exhibit via messaging and educational programs that highlight these challenges and teach guests how to better support wild species to ensure their future survival.


Contribute to Our Efforts

Community support remains crucial for LV Zoo to continue the high level of care and habitats for the residents under our devoted care. Individuals and organizations wishing to contribute to Habitat Madagascar can do so by visiting www.lvzoo.org/madagascar. All individual donors who contribute at least $500 or corporate sponsors that contribute at least $2,500 will receive a spot on our donor wall in the form of a custom laser-engraved wooden tile to be added to our landform mosaic of mainland Africa and the island of Madagascar.

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As a member-supported non-profit organization, Lehigh Valley Zoological Society was founded in 2004, but as a treasured community landmark, the Zoo’s history spans over a century. Founded in 1906 by General Harry C. Trexler, a local industrialist, the Lehigh Valley’s Trexler Game Preserve has educated and entertained more than five million people.

Accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), the Lehigh Valley Zoo hosts year-round, family-friendly events and activities, educational programs, and camps. With a mission to create a safe, engaging and enlightening wildlife experience for guests of all ages, the Zoo demonstrates leadership in the cultural, scientific and conservation communities. To learn more about Lehigh Valley Zoo, we invite you to visit our website, www.lvzoo.org, or follow us on Facebook @LVZOO.

Lehigh Valley Zoo Mourns Loss of Leena, the Dromedary Camel

Newsroom
Lehigh Valley Zoo
June 1, 2022

(Schnecksville, PA) – Lehigh Valley Zoo is deeply saddened to announce its matriarch Dromedary Camel, Leena, passed earlier this week at the age of 27.

Leena, the Dromedary CamelLeena’s keepers noticed her having difficulty getting around her exhibit due to arthritis. Leena’s condition was monitored closely through quality of life and welfare assessments. When her arthritis progressed to the point where treatment could no longer provide enough relief or comfort, LV Zoo’s veterinary and animal care teams made the difficult decision to euthanize her on Saturday afternoon.

Leena arrived at LV Zoo in 1997 from Virginia and spent her years in the Lehigh Valley living with her soon-to-be 23-year-old daughter, Baby, who was born at LV Zoo in 1999. While mourning the loss, LV Zoo staff will be keeping a close eye on Baby as she adjusts to this change.

Guests can visit Baby during LV Zoo daytime summer hours, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily.

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As a member-supported non-profit organization, Lehigh Valley Zoological Society was founded in 2004, but as a treasured community landmark, the Zoo’s history spans over a century. Founded in 1906 by General Harry C. Trexler, a local industrialist, the Lehigh Valley’s Trexler Game Preserve has educated and entertained more than five million people.

Accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), the Lehigh Valley Zoo hosts year-round, family-friendly events and activities, educational programs, and camps. With a mission to create a safe, engaging and enlightening wildlife experience for guests of all ages, the Zoo demonstrates leadership in the cultural, scientific and conservation communities. To learn more about Lehigh Valley Zoo, we invite you to visit our website, www.lvzoo.org, or follow us on Facebook @LVZOO.

Bison Calf Born on Nature Preserve

Newsroom
Lehigh Valley Zoo
May 17, 2022

Lehigh Valley Health Network is the Official Motherhood Partner of the LV Zoo


(Schnecksville, PA) – Lehigh Valley Zoo, in conjunction with Lehigh Valley Health Network are excited to announce that a bison calf has joined the herd last week! The calf was born on May 11, 2022. Both the calf and its mother are being monitored by Lehigh Valley Zoo animal care staff and veterinarians on the Trexler Nature Preserve, which surrounds the zoo property. Lehigh Valley Zoo is contracted by Lehigh County to care for the elk and bison in the Trexler Nature Preserve.

Bison calf with its motherBison calves are born with a reddish-tan color coat and can stand and nurse within 10-30 minutes after birth. They begin grazing on new green grass and drinking water within one week of birth, and it isn’t much longer before they begin follow their mothers on long distance walks! The calf and mother can be seen with the herd on the Preserve. Stay tuned for more information in the future as the calf continues to grow!

A special thank you to Lehigh Valley Health Network who is the official motherhood partner of the Lehigh Valley Zoo.

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Lehigh Valley Health Network includes eight hospital campuses, three in Allentown, one in Bethlehem, one in East Stroudsburg, one in Hazleton and two in Pottsville, Pa.; Coordinated Health, which includes two hospital campuses, nearly two dozen multispecialty locations including ambulatory surgery centers and orthopedic injury centers in northeastern Pennsylvania and western New Jersey; 26 health centers; numerous primary and specialty care physician practices; 22 ExpressCARE locations including the area’s only Children’s ExpressCARE; pharmacy, imaging, home health, rehabilitation and lab services; and preferred provider services through Valley Preferred. Specialty care includes: trauma care for adults and children, burn care at the Regional Burn Center; kidney and pancreas transplants; perinatal/neonatal, cardiac, cancer, orthopedics, neurology, complex neurosurgery capabilities including national certification as a Comprehensive Stroke Center, and robotic surgery in 10 specialties. Lehigh Valley Cancer Institute, Lehigh Valley Heart Institute and Lehigh Valley Institute for Surgical Excellence physicians provide the most advanced treatments. Lehigh Valley Cancer Institute is a member of the Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK) Cancer Alliance, an initiative that helps community providers improve the quality of cancer care and offers access to MSK clinical trials. Lehigh Valley Reilly Children’s Hospital, the community’s only children’s hospital, provides care in more than 30 specialties and general pediatrics. Lehigh Valley Hospital–Cedar Crest is the region’s only hospital nationally ranked by U.S. News & World Report for orthopedics and has been recognized among Pennsylvania’s top five hospitals for six consecutive years. Lehigh Valley Hospital (LVH)–Cedar Crest, LVH–17th Street and LVH–Muhlenberg are the region’s only Magnet® hospitals for nursing excellence. Additional information is available by visiting www.LVHN.org/motherhood, or following us on Facebook and Twitter.

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As a member-supported non-profit organization, Lehigh Valley Zoological Society was founded in 2004, but as a treasured community landmark, the Zoo’s history spans over a century. Founded in 1906 by General Harry C. Trexler, a local industrialist, the Lehigh Valley’s Trexler Game Preserve has educated and entertained more than five million people.

Accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), the Lehigh Valley Zoo hosts year-round, family-friendly events and activities, educational programs, and camps. With a mission to create a safe, engaging and enlightening wildlife experience for guests of all ages, the Zoo demonstrates leadership in the cultural, scientific and conservation communities. To learn more about Lehigh Valley Zoo, we invite you to visit our website, www.lvzoo.org, or follow us on Facebook @LVZOO.

Lehigh Valley Zoo Welcomes New Masai Giraffe

Newsroom
Lehigh Valley Zoo
May 13, 2022

Joshua Joins Tatu at the LV Zoo from Houston Zoo


(Schnecksville, PA) – Lehigh Valley Zoo is excited to officially announce the arrival of a new Masai giraffe. Joshua, a six-year-old male giraffe from Houston Zoo, will join six-year-old male giraffe, Tatu, in the Masai giraffe habitat at LV Zoo.

Masai Giraffes, Tatu and JoshuaJoshua is currently 16-1/2-feet tall and is still growing. He weighs more than 2,000 pounds. Born July 23, 2015, at Virginia Zoo, Joshua was the fifth calf born to mother, Imara, and father, Billy. Per the recommendation of the Giraffe Species Survival Plan (SSP) of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), Joshua joined the Houston Zoo in hopes for him to sire calves. While there, he successfully sired a son, Bobbie, with mother, Kamili, in September of 2019 – making them both first-time parents. Joshua has been remarkably trained by his team at Houston Zoo for behaviors such as blood draws. The LV Zoo team is thrilled to continue to work with him on his voluntary medical behaviors.

Masai Giraffes, Tatu and JoshuaThe experts at LV Zoo have created an introduction plan to help Joshua and Tatu establish a bond. In the initial period after his arrival, Joshua will have access to the giraffe barn so he can learn the lay of the land and settle into his new surroundings. Tatu will be able to investigate him through “howdy points,” which are designed to allow the pair to greet each other by choice. The animal care team at LV Zoo is well educated in animal behavior and once both giraffes are comfortable, staff will continue to give them more access to each other in different parts of the exhibit. This entire process will be carefully monitored by LV Zoo’s senior keepers, curators and veterinarians.

By participating in the SSP, accredited zoos are provided the opportunity to educate guests about Masai giraffe conservation and its importance to the ecosystem. Masai giraffes are listed as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), primarily due to poaching and changes in land use. There is an estimated 35,000 Masai giraffes remaining, but their population has fallen by 50 percent over the last three decades. The number of Masai giraffes under human care in the U.S. is small, and the SSP manages the population to ensure that it is healthy and genetically diverse so that the population thrives.

Giraffes are social animals, and can live in loose, unstable herds. These herds can vary from 10-20 individuals, although much larger herds have been observed. Individuals may join and leave the herd at will and there is no specific structure to the herd. Herds can be made up of all females, all males, or mixed genders of all ages. It is not uncommon for young males to form bachelor herds, and isolated individuals have been observed in the wild.

Adult male giraffes will establish dominance in the herd by sparring with one another. Sparring involves two individuals rubbing and intertwining their necks and heads. They will lean against each other to evaluate their opponent’s strength. Sparring may also include the two giraffes “necking” one another. Necking appears as the giraffe standing alongside one another and swinging their heads at the other giraffe. The strongest giraffe in this interaction will be established as the dominant male in the herd.

The Masai giraffe habitat at LV Zoo was built in 2016 and features opportunities for zoo guests to get up-close and personal with the animals through the Kiannala Feeding Deck. Joshua is accustomed to eating lettuce from guests as he did regularly at his prior home.

“The Zoo is excited to introduce the newest member of our family to the Lehigh Valley community,” said President & CEO Amanda Shurr. “Visiting the Zoo is the best way for the community to support our animals and staff, and we cannot wait to reopen our feeding deck so that our guests can get up-close to feed both Tatu and Joshua.”

LV Zoo expects to announce the opening of giraffe feeding deck in the near future.


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As a member-supported non-profit organization, Lehigh Valley Zoological Society was founded in 2004, but it has been treasured community landmark for centuries. Located in the Lehigh Valley’s Trexler Game Preserve, we have educated and entertained more than five million people. Accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), the Lehigh Valley Zoo hosts year-round, family-friendly events and activities, educational programs, and camps. Through a mission to create a safe, engaging and enlightening wildlife experience for guests of all ages, the Zoo demonstrates leadership in the cultural, scientific and conservation communities. To learn more about Lehigh Valley Zoo, we invite you to visit our website, www.lvzoo.org, or follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

WFMZ’s Ali Reid visits LVZoo for Party for the Planet

Newsroom
Lehigh Valley Zoo
April 22, 2022
Ali Reid of 69 News WFMZ visited the Lehigh Valley Zoo this busy Friday morning to talk all things conservation and Earth Day, as well as to give the scoop on improvements being made to the Zoo and announce a new Zoo resident coming this spring!

Ali and Lehigh Valley Zoo COO Matt Provence visited ourJaindl Penguin Pavilion, which is currently undergoing improvements to make the exhibit space more naturalistic and more accessible to some of our older African penguins. Then they headed down to visit our kangaroos and wallabies where they discussed the construction of Habitat Madagascar, a brand new indoor-outdoor exhibit for our lemurs and tortoises that will break ground this spring.

Ali then met with Lehigh Valley Zoo Curator Maggie Morse at our Mexican gray wolves exhibit to discuss some of the fun things happening this weekend for Party for the Planet at the Zoo, and to share some of the great conservation success stories from Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA) initiatives.

Lehigh Valley Zoo CEO Amanda Shurr then met with Ali at the Giraffe Barn, where the Zoo’s tallest resident, Masai giraffe Tatu, helped dish the inside scoop on a new resident coming to Lehigh Valley Zoo this spring. That’s right – another giraffe is coming to join Tatu as part of the giraffe Species Survival Plan (SSP) program!

Ali finished off her visit by catching up with Promotions & Special Events Manager Elise Yardley at the goat barn, where they discussed all the fun activities happening this weekend at Party for the Planet sponsored by Cougle’s Recycling, Inc. Guests visiting the Zoo this weekend will have the opportunity to actively engage with the Zoo’s mission of conservation through an array of fun activities like recycling games, a scavenger hunt, and Friday Zoo Tours. Edge of the Woods Native Plant Nursery will also be on site Saturday and Sunday to provide information on the importance of using native plants in gardening and landscaping.

Don’t miss Party for the Planet, as well as other upcoming Zoo events like Mothers Day at the Zoo, Migratory Bird Day, and Red Wine & Blue!


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As a member-supported non-profit organization, Lehigh Valley Zoological Society was founded in 2004, but it has been treasured community landmark for centuries. Located in the Lehigh Valley’s Trexler Game Preserve, we have educated and entertained more than five million people. Accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), the Lehigh Valley Zoo hosts year-round, family-friendly events and activities, educational programs, and camps. Through a mission to create a safe, engaging and enlightening wildlife experience for guests of all ages, the Zoo demonstrates leadership in the cultural, scientific and conservation communities. To learn more about Lehigh Valley Zoo, we invite you to visit our website, www.lvzoo.org, or follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Lehigh Valley Zoo to Update African Penguin Exhibit

Newsroom
Lehigh Valley Zoo
April 21, 2022

The Penguin Habitat is One of Several Projects Underway to Improve the Guest Experience


(Schnecksville, PA) – Lehigh Valley Zoo announced plans for a major renovation to its African Penguin habitat – the Jaindl Penguin Pavilion at the zoo’s main entrance. The project is expected to start this week, which coincides with the penguins being off-exhibit due to the continued presence of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) in the North American flyway.

The renovations, being made by Authentic Environments USA, Inc., include updating the façade of the building to give it a more authentic representation of the South African habitat. The plans are designed to encourage the penguins’ natural behavior, from swimming to nesting and rearing young. The addition of ramps will also provide the older penguins easier access to all areas of the habitat. The Zoo is privileged to have an anonymous donor contribute half of the cost of the project, with the Zoo funding the remaining portion with operating funds.

LV Zoo is home to 12 African Penguins, ranging from ages five to 25. The African Black Footed Penguin is classified as Endangered; and, at LV Zoo, they are a part of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ (AZA) Species Survival Program. An AZA Species Survival Program strives to manage and conserve a threatened or endangered species population by developing a Breeding and Transfer Plan that identifies population management goals and recommendations to ensure the sustainability of a healthy, genetically diverse, and demographically varied population. As an AZA accredited zoo, LV Zoo continually monitors exhibits for wear and tear and updates them on a routine basis using modern materials safe for animal use.

Given the recent detection of HPAI in the North American Atlantic flyway, LV Zoo’s most at-risk birds – the penguins in addition to barnyard birds, guineas, swan and geese – are currently off exhibit for their safety and well-being. Currently, the colony remains in its holding area while receiving the same exceptional care from the zoo’s animal care team. More information can be found on the Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture website. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the recent HPAI detections in birds do not present an immediate public health concern, with no human cases detected in the U.S.


Another project underway at LV Zoo is the addition of a secondary entrance that features a new Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)-compliant pathway, which will allow direct access from the zoo’s lower parking area. The new entrance, expected to be completed by Memorial Day, is being constructed by Schultz Construction Management Inc. and funded by Lehigh County. LV Zoo continues to expand its inclusion efforts to help provide guests of all ages and abilities the opportunity to enjoy all that the zoo has to offer.

These projects are alongside the plans for LV Zoo’s new exhibit – Habitat Madagascar – which is scheduled to break ground in May. This modern indoor/outdoor habitat will house the zoo’s Lemurs and Tortoises and allow these species to remain on exhibit year-round.

Community support remains crucial for LV Zoo to continue the high level of care and habitats for the residents under the zoo’s devoted care. Contributions can be made through the zoo’s website by clicking here.


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As a member-supported non-profit organization, Lehigh Valley Zoological Society was founded in 2004, but it has been treasured community landmark for centuries. Located in the Lehigh Valley’s Trexler Game Preserve, we have educated and entertained more than five million people. Accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), the Lehigh Valley Zoo hosts year-round, family-friendly events and activities, educational programs, and camps. Through a mission to create a safe, engaging and enlightening wildlife experience for guests of all ages, the Zoo demonstrates leadership in the cultural, scientific and conservation communities. To learn more about Lehigh Valley Zoo, we invite you to visit our website, www.lvzoo.org, or follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Kangaroos temporarily relocated to Tammar Wallaby exhibit

We’re preparing for the groundbreaking of our new exhibit, Habitat Madagascar! This means we have a lot to prepare for so we can get construction started.

Because construction is taking place next to our Kangaroo Walkabout, our mob is taking an extended vacation, across the pathway! You can now find our kangaroos bouncing around with our tammar wallabies. You may see some or all on exhibit as they have access to their behind the scenes holding to ensure they feel safe getting accommodated to their new habitat.

Our amazing animal care team will be monitoring them during this transition and we ask guests to please respect their space during this time while we they get used to their temporary home!

AZA Zoos Along East Coast Brace for Contagious Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI)

Newsroom
Lehigh Valley Zoo
February 25, 2022

AZA ZOOS ALONG THE EAST COAST BRACE FOR CONTAGIOUS HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA (HPAI)AFFECTING BIRDS FROM SOUTH CAROLINA TO MAINE


(Schnecksville, PA) – This week, the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed the presence of a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in the U.S., along the North American Atlantic flyway. With confirmed cases in South Carolina, Virginia, Delaware, Kentucky, Indiana, New York and Maine, identified in commercial and non-commercial flocks, HPAI is highly contagious among wild and domestic birds, causing extreme illness and or possibly death.

As a result of the highly transmissible nature of HPAI, Zoos along the east coast have started to implement enhanced safety precautions to protect the birds in their care. Working together to share timely and critical information, animal care teams at Lehigh Valley Zoo, Adventure Aquarium, Philadelphia, Elmwood Park, Brandywine, Erie , Maryland and Pittsburgh Zoos — supported by the USDA and APHIS — have elected to move the most susceptible species indoors to eliminate contact with wild birds on zoo grounds. Other precautions taken include higher levels of biosecurity for birds, personal protective equipment for staff; and restricted access to bird areas.

“The LV Zoo is accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) and proudly demonstrates how we are upholding some of the highest standards in the field,” Curator Maggie Morse said. “This is evident by our quick response to protect our resident birds from HPAI by working with other local AZA Zoos, our on-staff veterinarians and our animal care team. Our most at-risk species have been moved off exhibit and will be monitored by our dedicated staff. We will continue to keep a close eye on positive cases of HPAI ensuring we continue to provide excellent care to our Zoo residents.”

LV Zoo’s on-site veterinarians have started implementing an established protocol that was created to mitigate and keep our animals safe from outbreaks such as HPAI. At this time, due to the proximity of positive cases, barnyard birds, waterfowl and penguins have been brought inside since they are most at risk. Should cases be reported closer to the Lehigh Valley, the staff is prepared to act quickly to safely move the rest of our birds off exhibit.

Committed to protecting the birds in their care, the Zoos listed above will continue to work closely with each other, the USDA, the State Veterinary Medical Officer, APHIS and the Department of Public Health to stay current and abreast of any new updates. With many strains of the same virus, experts are still working to estimate how long this virus can affect birds in the U.S.

Symptoms of HPAI in birds include sneezing, coughing, walking or swimming in circles, and swelling of the legs and feet. Although wild waterfowl are the most common carriers, they are often asymptomatic while birds of prey, such as hawks and owls, and scavengers, such as crows and gulls, may show more severe infection. Other animals susceptible, include carnivores, non-human primates, and pigs with possible infection occurring after the animal consumes an infected bird or consumes food that has been contaminated an infected bird. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the recent HPAI detections in birds do not present an immediate public health concern, with no human cases detected in the U.S.


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As a member-supported non-profit organization, Lehigh Valley Zoological Society was founded in 2004, but it has been treasured community landmark for centuries. Located in the Lehigh Valley’s Trexler Game Preserve, we have educated and entertained more than five million people. Accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), the Lehigh Valley Zoo hosts year-round, family-friendly events and activities, educational programs, and camps. Through a mission to create a safe, engaging and enlightening wildlife experience for guests of all ages, the Zoo demonstrates leadership in the cultural, scientific and conservation communities. To learn more about Lehigh Valley Zoo, we invite you to visit our website, www.lvzoo.org, or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Mill Creek Road Under Construction

Newsroom
Lehigh Valley Zoo
February 16, 2022
(Schnecksville, PA) – Road work has begun on Mill Creek Road in Schnecksville. This may impact your typical route to the Lehigh Valley Zoo.

In order to avoid driving issues or delays, please use one of our preferred routes on your way to the Zoo.

For vehicles over 8 feet tall (school buses, coaches, delivery vehicles, etc.), please either use one of the Rte 100 routes or the Vendor/Truck/Bus routes via 309.

   Preferred Routes